Blog Archive: 2009

Quantum inspired classical results

on Comments (7)

In yesterday’s post, I mentioned that one of my favorite topics is classical results informed by the quantum information processing viewpoint. There are now sufficiently many such results that Drucker and deWolf have written a survey, “Quantum Proofs for Classical Theorems.” I was surprised last month, when another such  example popped up in one of the biggest cryptographic results of 2009, Craig Gentry’s discovery of a fully homomorphic encryption scheme.

Continue Reading

Quantum Computing for Technology Managers

on Comments (3)

Wiley’s Handbook of Technology Management, which includes my entry on Quantum Computing, just appeared. I received my tome in the mail today. It is definitely the biggest, weightiest, and most expensive publication I’ve contributed to yet! I was only willing to write the entry if I could also post it on the ArXiv. Wiley agreed, so you can find my entry on the ArXiv as “An Overview of Quantum Computing for Technology Managers.”

I hope the entry conveys the excitement of the field while eliminating some of the hype.  It is focused on what is known about what quantum computers can and cannot do. It does not try to explain how they do what they do. (For that, my tutorial with Wolfgang Polak remains a good starting place.) While the entry discusses well known aspects of quantum computation, such as Shor’s algorithm, quantum key distribution, and quantum teleportation,  it also discusses many lesser known results including more recent algorithmic results and established limitations on quantum computation. I had the pleasure of writing about some of my favorite topics in quantum computing, including purely classical results inspired by the quantum information processing point of view, the elegant cluster state model of quantum computation, and Aaronson’s suggestion that limits on computational power be considered a fundamental guiding principle for physical theories, much like the laws of thermodynamics.

Comments and questions welcome!