More evidence of the value of HMD capture

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At next week’s CSCW 2015 conference, a group from University of Wisconsin-Madison will present an interesting piece of work related to the last post: “Handheld or Handsfree? Remote Collaboration via Lightweight Head-Mounted Displays and Handheld Devices”. Similar to our work, the authors compared the use of Google Glass to a tablet-based interface for two different construction tasks: one simple and one more complex. While in our case study participants created tutorials to be viewed at a later time, this test explored synchronous collaboration.

The authors found that Google Glass was helpful for the more difficult task, enabling better and more frequent communication, while for the simpler task the results were mixed. This more-or-less agrees with our findings: HMDs are helpful for capturing and communicating complicated tasks but less so for table-top tasks.

Another key difference between this work and ours is that the authors relied on Google Hangouts to stream videos. However, as the authors write, “the HMD interface of Google Hangouts used in our study did not offer [live preview feedback],” a key feature for any media capture application.

At FXPAL, we build systems when we are limited by off-the-shelf technology. So when we discovered a related capture feedback issue in early pilots we were able to quickly fix it in our tool. Of course in our case the technology was much simpler because we did not need to implement video streaming. However, since this paper was published we have developed mechanisms to stream video from Glass, or any Android device, using open WebRTC protocols. More than that, our framework can analyze incoming frames and then stream out arbitrary image data, potentially allowing us to implement many of the design implications the authors describe in the paper’s discussion section.