Blog Category: Events

CollaboPlanner @ CSCW 2018

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Traveling and visiting new cities is often done in pairs or groups. Besides, searching collaboratively for places of interest is a common activity that frequently occurs on individual mobile phones, or on large tourist-information displays in public places such as visitor centers or train stations.

Prior work suggests that the technologies available to travelers prevent effective collaborative trip planning. Each of these modalities has its pros and cons in terms of supporting collaborative decision-making in the tourist context: mobile phones are private and familiar, but lack screen real estate and are hard to co-reference; large public displays are bigger and can provide content from multiple sources in one place but are located in a fixed position and are more visible to others.

We created CollaboPlanner, a collaborative itinerary planning application that combines mobile interaction with a public display, and evaluated them against third-party mobile apps in a simulated travel-search task to understand how the unique features of mobile phones and large displays might be leveraged together to improve collaborative travel planning experience.

We designed CollaboPlanner to support two scenarios: creating travel itineraries with a public display application, and creating travel itineraries with the public display and mobile applications combined.

CollaboPlanner

CollaboPlanner allows users to explore destinations, add them to an itinerary, and see their itinerary visualized on an interactive map. The hybrid version of CollaboPlanner includes a dedicated mobile app. This mobile app allows users to select preferences independently and then send them to the large display for additional discussion and decision-making.

Our user tests provide initial evidence that while using mobile phones is familiar, public displays have added advantages, both as standalone tools and in combination with a mobile app to help travelers collaboratively search unfamiliar environments.

Come see our demo at 6:00PM on November 5th (Mon) to find out more about this system as well as find a restaurant in NYC!

Matthew Lee of FXPAL is also presenting ReflectLive@CSCW 2018.

FXPAL @ CHI 2018

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A collage of figures from our CHI 2018 Papers.This year FXPAL is happy to present four papers (three long papers and one case study) at CHI 2018 in Montreal. Our featured work this year investigates the themes of Human-Centered Workstyle, Information Visualization, and Internet of Things.

You can check out the papers now:

Long Papers

Case Study

Come by and say bonjour in Canada!

HCIR 2012 keynote

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Last week we held the HCIR 2012 Symposium in Cambridge, Mass. This is the sixth in a series that we have organized. We expanded the format of this year’s meeting to a day and a half, and in addition to the posters, search challenge reports, and short talks, we introduced full papers reviewed to first-tier conference standards. I will write more about these later, and for details on other events at the Symposium, I refer you to the excellent blog post by one of the other co-orgranizers, Daniel Tunkelang.

In this post, I wanted to record my impressions of the keynote talk by Marti Hearst from UC Berkeley.

Opening slide from Marti Hearst's keynote address

 

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CFP: HCIR 2012 Symposium

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We are happy to announce that the 2012 Human-Computer Information Retrieval Symposium (HCIR 2012) will be held in Cambridge, Massachusetts October 4 – 5, 2012. The HCIR series of workshops has provided a venue for discussion of ongoing research on a range of topics related to interactive information retrieval, including interaction techniques, evaluation, models and algorithms for information retrieval, visual design, user modeling, etc. The focus of these meetings has been to bring together people from industry and academia for short presentations and in-depth discussion. Attendance has grown steadily since the first meeting, and as a result this year we have decided to modify the structure of the meeting to accommodate the increasing demand for participation.

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IIiX2010 Doctoral Consortium

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The IIiX 2010 Doctoral Consortium was a rather intense ten hours filled with great ideas and discussion. We had 11 students and six advisers, representing a broad range of universities and areas of interest related to information seeking. Each student made a 20-25 minute presentation, followed by questions from the advisers and from other students; in addition, there were two 45 minute one-one-one sessions during which students received feedback from an adviser, and also from another student.

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HCIR hat trick

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The IIiX2010 conference is coming up, and it promises to be a great week. For me it will start with the Doctoral Consortium, followed by the conference proper, and capped off by the HCIR workshop. I’ve sat in on some doctoral consortia in the past, but this will be my first fully-fledged one. I am looking forward to the presentations and the discussion, and I will be blogging about the various presentations in the coming week.

I don’t expect to get much sleep!

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Enterprise Search Summit 2010

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The Enterprise Search Summit is taking place right now, and I am sorry to be missing it. The program looks quite interesting, including keynotes by Marti Hearst and Peter Morville, among others. Marti’s talk this morning, related to her recent book on information retrieval, was summarized by Daniel Tunkelang on his blog. While she did touch on topics covered in her book, including some of the collaborative search work done here at FXPAL, she has shifted her focus somewhat to address the more social issues around information seeking. While I don’t the details of her presentation, she did mention similar topics when she participated at a recent panel on search at the WWW2010 conference. The twitter streams from both events capture her “socialize vs. personalize” comments. (Since Twitter search sunsets quickly, here are the TwapperKeeper archives for #ess10 and the www2010 Search Is Dead panel.)

Peter Morville should be an interesting speaker on information retrieval-related topics, some of which he covers in his books Search Patterns and Ambient Findability. I wrote about some of his ideas earlier, but am curious to hear how he is presenting his work.

I hope that both talks are recorded and made available on the web.

Update: Daniel Tunkelang’s summary of Peter Morville’s talk

Position papers for Collab Info Seeking workshop

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We had a record crop of position papers for the Collaborative Information Seeking (CIS) workshop we’re organizing at CSCW 2010. Underscoring the ubiquity of collaboration in information seeking, the position papers address everything from health care to emergency response to SecondLife to the information seeking ecology within the enterprise. The papers clustered out into several broad categories, although some papers could have been easily classified in more than one way.

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Twitter and disasters waiting to happen

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The recent earthquake in Haiti has attracted attention from Twitter users and researchers. Twitter has been used to collect donations, to contact people on the ground, to coordinate relief efforts, etc. Recently, U. Colorado’s EPIC Group proposed a hash-tag-based syntax on top of Twitter messages to help automate the parsing of actionable messages, and to do so effectively and reliably. This is a noble effort, but as Manas Tungare points out, the proposed syntax is too complex for its intended users, who have more pressing issues than dealing with hash tags.

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